Archived entries for everything but the kitchen sink

Squash Film – 55 days to harvest

vimeo vimeo.com/

Time lapse film of squash growing in Phoenix, AZ. 55 days to harvest.

Kale Film – 95 days to harvest

vimeo vimeo.com/

Kale – 95 days to harvest

Broccoli Film – 105 days to harvest

vimeo vimeo.com/

radish film – 40 days to harvest

vimeo vimeo.com/

Time lapse of radishes. 45 days to harvest.
I am a fourth generation farmer whose land and life are quickly being overcome by suburbia. Because of the encroachment I was inspired to create ‘lifecycles’ to collect and share the images from the most important daily process of agriculture, the growth of our produce. Using timelapse photography, I have begun the process of filming everything I grow, and inviting other farmers to do the same. The arranged short films show a single production cycle of each plant/tree. Ambient noises are taken from the farm and plants while growing, and the accompanying music is composed by musicians inspired by the footage. I invite you to watch your food grow, and better understand what an effort these plants undertake to make it to the marketplace and later to your tables. Thanks for your time, and I hope you enjoy watching them grow as much as I have.
Matt

Fresh Market Grocery Store installation

Here are some photos from the grocery store

Fresh Market Grocery Store in Park City, Utah.

Fresh Market Grocery Store in Park City, Utah.

lettuce at the market

lettuce at the market

radish at the market

radish at the market

the biggest fans

the biggest fans

Sundance Interview by Mike Plante

http://festival.sundance.org/2010/news/article/meet_the_artists_matthew_moore_tracks_foods_journey_from_seed_to_market/

Still from New Frontiers

Still from New Frontiers

‘In this Week’ article Salt Lake City

A link to a article in local newspaper “In this Week”radish market

Write up in Phoenix New Times

Here is a link to an article by Kathleen Vanesian in the Phoenix New Times, a local newspaper out in my diggs in Arizona.

http://blogs.phoenixnewtimes.com/uponsun/2010/01/food_for_thought_artist_matthe.php

A little blurb:

Food for Thought: Artist Matthew Moore to Show Work at 2010 Sundance Film Festival

Phoenix artist Matthew Moore, who’s also a fourth-generation Arizona farmer, has just combined my two all-time favorite activities: food shopping and art viewing. His latest video installation, “Lifecycles,” which magically melds the two, is premiering at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival’s New Frontier exhibition. The event, curated by film festival senior programmer Shari Frilot, has, for several years, run concurrently with the star-studded, Robert Redford-originated film festival in Park City, Utah……

Rendering of lifecycles in local store.

Rendering of lifecycles in local store.

Farm History

My family has been farming the same land 35 miles west of Phoenix, Arizona since the 1920’s.   My grandfather’s uncle Jim purchased the first small portion of the ground back then, and soon after my grandfather moved from Richmond, California to be raised by his Uncle Jim and Aunt Lola.  Waddell, Arizona did not have much to offer back then from a farming point of view, but with the newly constructed Waddell Dam in the early ’20s the desert landscape was quickly being plowed under to grow citrus, grapes, and eventually a crop that Arizona became well known for, cotton.  My grandfather met my grandmother in Phoenix and they were married as they finished up their time in the military. They used their GI bills to purchase the first major piece of ground since the original family purchase.  Mickey and Bob farmed alfalfa in the begining years, but expanded to cotton as market prices rose for the commodity in the post war economy.  My grandparents raised three children, in Waddell.   Michael, the oldest, is my Father, and he ended up returning to the farm after a stint in the Navy and a quick job search in aerospace engineering, both of which had career paths that dimmed in comparison to return to the farm.  My father returned to the farm just before I was born and steered the business though some tough times during the ’90s when the cotton market was bottoming out….they do not call cotton poverty weed for no reason.  In the ’90s my father grew organic green and brown cotton, watermelons, onions, and many other vegetables until settling on carrots, which we still grow today.  I returned from undergraduate school and worked for a few years on the farm before returning to school to get a graduate degree in sculpture in San Francisco.  It was during that time the development began to ramp up in the Phoenix area.  By the time I returned from San Francisco in 2003 to the farm, suburbia was less than 3 miles from my childhood home.  I have been running the family business ever since my return.  We still grow carrots, and now parsnips.  We also have two small organic farms, one a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture), the other a direct market farm for restaurants and markets.  It is on these farms that the time lapse units reside.

Nearby Development 2003

Nearby Development 2003



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